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Tyler G. Okimoto

Dr. TYLER G. OKIMOTO is a Senior Lecturer in Management in the business school at the University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia. He received his Ph.D. in social and organizational psychology from New York University in 2005. Prior to joining the faculty at UQ, Tyler worked as a postdoctoral researcher in the School of Management at Yale University, and in the School of Psychology at Flinders University in Adelaide, Australia.

Dr. Okimoto's research tackles issues of social justice in organizations, politics, and society more broadly, particularly how biases in organisational and ethical decision-making contribute to discrimination, unethical practices, injustice, and conflict within and between groups. His research has been featured in a variety of news media and policy outlets, including features on Good Morning America, the NPR Morning Show (USA), the recent book, 'How to Publish High Impact Research' (APA), and the American Association of University Women 2010 report, 'Why so few? Women in STEM.'  Dr. Okimoto's research tackles issues of social justice in organizations, politics, and society more broadly, particularly how biases in organisational and ethical decision-making contribute to discrimination, unethical practices, injustice, and conflict within and between groups. His research has been featured in a variety of news media and policy outlets, including features on Good Morning America, the NPR Morning Show (USA), the recent book, 'How to Publish High Impact Research' (APA), and the American Association of University Women 2010 report, 'Why so few? Women in STEM.' 

Tyler's research tackles issues of social justice in organizations, politics, and society more broadly, particularly how biases in organizational and ethical decision-making contribute to discrimination, unethical practices, injustice, and conflict within and between groups.   His research has been featured in a variety of news media and policy outlets, including features on Good Morning America, the NPR Morning Show, and the American Association for University Women 2010 report, 'Why so few? Women in STEM'.  In 2012 he was awarded the Early Career Researcher Award from the International Society for Justice Research for his contributions to the understanding of conflict and justice repair.  He currently holds two major research grants studying the barriers preventing effective reconciliation and reintegration in the aftermath of workplace transgressions, as well as following major socio-political disputes.  

 Recent Selected Publications:

Okimoto, T. G. & Gromet, D. M. (in press). Differences in sensitivity to deviance partly explain ideological divides in social policy support. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.      [LINK]

Steffens, N. K., Mols, F., Haslam, S. A., & Okimoto, T. G. (in press). True to what we stand for: Championing collective interests as a path to authentic leadership. The Leadership Quarterly.       [LINK]

Thomas, D.C., Liao, Y., Aycan, Z., Pekerti, A.A., Ravlin, E.C., Stahl, G.K., Lazaroa, M.B., Fock, H., Arli, D. Moeller, M., Okimoto, T.G., & van de Vijver, F. (2015). Cultural intelligence: A theory-based, short form measure. Journal of International Business Studies, 46(9), 1099-1118.     [LINK]

Okimoto, T. G., Wenzel, M., & Hornsey, M. J. (2015). Apologies demanded yet devalued: Normative dilution in the age of apology. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 60, 133-136.      [LINK]

Gromet, D. M. & Okimoto, T. G. (2014). Back into the fold: The influence of offender amends and victim forgiveness on reintegration. Business Ethics Quarterly, 24(3), 411-441.      [LINK]

Okimoto, T. G. & Wenzel, M. (2014). Bridging diverging perspectives and repairing damaged relationships in the aftermath of workplace transgressions. Business Ethics Quarterly, 24(3), 443-473.      [LINK]